Category: Blog

The best piece of advice for leaders: Trust your employees

THE BEST PIECE OF ADVICE FOR LEADERS: TRUST YOUR EMPLOYEES 

Author: Gabriella Anesio


Webamp spoke with David Furland Ree, Managing Partner at Permild & Rosengreen, about the necessity of leaders being able to have faith in their employees to do their job. Trusting results in less stress, and less stress results in more time for your family and friends put all of this together and you have the recipe for a successful and thriving company. 

Permild & Rosengreen is a poster shop that sells an array of different types of posters, from retro style posters to graphic design posters. Its Managing Partner, David Furland Ree, is also an experienced graphic designer, meaning he’s able to work on both the management side, as well as the creative and artistic side of the company. 

David is a firm believer in the policy that if you trust your employees, business can only get better, and your life more stress-free. Despite innumerous customers placing orders at Permild & Rosengreen every week, one of the strongest company values that permeates throughout the business is that of work-life balance. 

“I think the work-life balance is very important, and that when people go home after work, they are done with their work. We have some employees that work in the webshop, and they don’t have access to this from home – we did this on purpose. It’s important to work, but when you’re off, you’re off.”

This sentiment is something easily preached, but not often implemented in the world of business. By denying access to the webshop to employees when they’re not in the office, David makes sure he stands by his promise of keeping work within the realms of working hours (which are only 32, as opposed to 37, hours – all in the name of making more time for both family and also for yourself). 

You need Zzzzzs to excel 

Not only does David firmly believe that it is essential for his employees to be well-rested for themselves, he is also of the opinion that this is actually a measure of success for the company itself. 

“Of course money can be an indicator of success, but you don’t need to earn millions to be successful. Success can simply mean employees are doing their job effectively, meaning my employees and I can have more time for family and relaxation. If I’m relaxed when I get home, then I know things are going well because I’m not stressing over a thousand things I didn’t do that day. It’s more important for me to have more time relaxed, whilst earning less, than being stressed and earning (potentially) more.”

It is simple science that getting a certain number of hours of sleep per night and time for relaxation improves health and, thus, efficiency in the workplace, and this is something David stands firmly by. With a big family at home, coming back from the office with work to do in the briefcase is simply not an option – nor is it for his employees – and this is what leads to a company culture premised upon easygoingness. 

In addition to being adamant about the necessity of being able to make time for yourself and your family, David is also a firm believer in the autonomy of employees. As already made clear, trust is paramount in his relationship with everyone at Permild & Rosengreen, and that also means he trusts workers to make decisions without his permission 24/7. 

In fact, the Managing Partner believes taking ownership of the decisions you make is critical to maintain this cherished, healthy work-life balance. Should employees have to check in with David every time a decision has to be made, not only would the management side be slowed down, but it would render work done by employees ineffective and much more time-consuming than it needs to be. 

Bleeping up isn’t all that bad 

This is the style of leadership espoused by David, and when asking him what the one piece of advice would be that he would give to other leaders out there, he responded:

“Trust your employees. Simply put, everything just becomes easier when you trust them to do their job and make decisions, because then they also trust you as a leader. No one can ever make a decision that will cost the entire company. The most you can mess up is a sum of money that we can make up for.”

The mantra of one single decision not having the power to make someone’s career, or the company for that matter, crumble is without a doubt a winning formula. There is, however, one price to pay at Permild & Rosengreen for a bad decision made a price with a very small numerical value, but a great message:

“If somebody makes a mistake, which is completely fine, the price for this mistake is buying croissants for everybody at work. So, the next day we eat the croissants, chat a bit, and simply move on.”

Croissants. That’s right. You mess up, and the price to pay isn’t your job or your pride, but pastries for your colleagues. 

The beauty of this little tradition is that when someone makes a mistake, the focus isn’t solely on the person who bleeped up, but on the entire team because after all, decisions have the power to impact everyone in the company, so buying croissants for everyone in the team is a very subtle reminder that you have a responsibility to make great decisions not just for yourself, but for the team, and when you make potentially bad decisions, it doesn’t only impact you, but everyone around you, too. 

A big thank you to David Furland Ree for his comments on managing a team and managing workload in and out of the office. If you’d like to decorate your walls, take a look at Permild & Rosengreen, and if you want to see the man behind it all, find David Furland Ree on LinkedIn. 

To read more about leadership and company culture, have a look at Nicolai Vittrup’s blog, and for content related to SEO, PPC, and everything web, check out Webamp. Any comments or thoughts can be left on the contact form on this website, or connect with Nicolai Vittrup on LinkedIn

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The unexpected joy of failure

THE UNEXPECTED JOY OF FAILURE

Author: Sophie Moore


Nicolai Vittrup, founder of Webamp in Copenhagen, has nothing bad to say about failing. In fact he enjoys the lessons and growth that it results in. 

Reflecting on the failures he learnt the most from in the early days of his company, he recalls a time in which the company was in danger of being stolen by some previous employees and what lessons it brought to him. His attitude towards this potential disaster is one we can all learn from. 

“I had two key points that I took from that experience, one of them was that no one can take me, they cannot take the battery out of me and stop me doing what I do best, they cannot steal my identity and what makes me me. And the DNA that I built Webamp on was so strong even then, so even if they wanted to copy Webamp, and still to this day if you want to copy Webamp, I think the DNA here is just too strong to duplicate. When we lose somebody, we always get the right fit for the team just afterwards, so we always seem to be getting better and better as a team. The second point was that if someone wants to steal something from you, it’s important to fight against it but to also focus more on creating and moving forwards than on defending. By defending you can waste a lot of time on nothing and that’s the key learning there. If you just focus on creating and you’re just building and building and growing all the time, I think your competitors have a problem. They won’t be able to keep up.” 

That’s the thing about failure : you can either let it consume you or you can use it to fuel you to do better, to be better. It can be all too easy to allow yourself to get caught up in the way things have gone wrong, to admit defeat and give up when things get tough. And yet there is a special kind of strength that can be found in those moments where you find yourself struggling but still manage to get back up on your feet. Webamp is a company which uses this strength to it’s advantage. 

“A positive mind is key in this as well. We’ve learnt a lot about customer experience, customer journey and the importance of looking our clients in the eye and being open and honest with them when things don’t go to plan. It’s the same within the company, if you’re having a bad time at Webamp you need to be honest about it. We all want to be there for each other but that can only happen if there is open communication.” 

This leads to the question of how to be a good leader, even in the face of failure. The question of how to create a working environment that makes each and every employee feel as though they are part of something bigger, to encourage connections and a sense of community that breathes life into the four walls of the office space. You can design an office to be the most efficient, aesthetically pleasing space in the entire world but without that team atmosphere and community spirit it will feel lifeless. At Webamp this is definitely not the case, the atmosphere is one of equality and openness, mostly down to Nicolai’s relaxed demeanor and the relationship he has built with each person he has hired. He views his employees as equally important to the success of the company. No one person is more or less responsible for the smooth running of Webamp than another. 

“I think with freedom comes responsibility. That’s where we start every morning. My employees know I trust them 100% from day one. It’s always their job to prove me right, never my job to prove them wrong. If you trust your own hiring and trust in the DNA of your team, people will build the culture themselves. I think the culture here is very strong because people come here to be better and because they are passionate about what they do. If you have people who are passionate and who are willing to work for what they want to do, it’s very easy to motivate and keep them going and encourage them to do better every day.” 

To read more about Webamp and the work they do relating to SEO and all things web related, on the website here. To connect with Nicolai Vittrup, find him on LinkedIn. To read more about leadership, find the blog here

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Finding your purpose and trusting yourself

FINDING YOUR PURPOSE AND TRUSTING YOURSELF

Author: Sophie Moore 


Founder of Webamp Nicolai Vittrup began his journey to success five and a half years ago from a small apartment in Nørrebro, frustrated with working for other people and struggling to find his way in the professional world. Deciding to take a leap of faith and invest everything he had into a new venture, he entered the world of entrepreneurship. 

Fast forward to today as he prepares to expand his successful company’s expertise into the realms of Social Media, he reflects on what pushed him towards becoming an  entrepreneur.

“I was working in a lot of places and trying to fit in, to find the right place for me to be and trying to find my purpose.”

Purpose is a tricky thing to find, some of us stumble upon it in a stroke of luck, others spend years of their life searching for it, the ever elusive answer to the question of what they are destined to do. In a world where everyone seems to have it all figured out, it can be hard to trust your instincts and fully embrace what you interpret to be your calling.

For Nicolai the driver towards finding his purpose has always been the notion of freedom.

“Freedom is my purpose, both the freedom of creating and the freedom of forging my own path. Back then I was very much about the freedom of just doing and creating, of doing something for myself and being my own boss.” This freedom has manifested itself into the very ethos of his company, his mantra being “Freedom under Responsibility” for all who work at Webamp. 

It wasn’t always easy and yet Nicolai has a lot of wisdom to share about the merits of following your truth.

As he puts it – “I wasn’t happy when I was working before Webamp and honestly I’m still not happy with absolutely everything but you know that’s life. A lot of the jobs I did involved me doing a lot of things I didn’t like doing. I did a lot of tasks and jobs that I didn’t really want to do, and wasn’t capable of doing, or good enough even. And that’s one of the things that I’ve found with entrepreneurship is that if you’re not good enough to do something, you can just hire someone else to do it.”

Being an entrepreneur means knowing your strengths and sticking to them, it means admitting when there is someone else out there who can help you out, who can do a better job of it than you can. By bringing great minds together that are thriving at what they do best, you ensure that what you are producing is the best it can possibly be. By playing to your strengths and allowing others to do the same, entrepreneurship can truly lead to something magical. The freedom of working for yourself, doing what aligns with your deepest core values and creating something that truly reflects them is what will make you thrive in the professional world, according to Nicolai. You can have the best set of values in the world but to truly do something extraordinary you need to create something that completely embodies them. Actions speak louder than words as the saying goes.

“Boxes are created in our society, and that’s why I think to break the boxes of society you need to really trust yourself, be ready to make a lot of failures and yet keep pushing through. You just need to keep going, because to break the norm, you need to do something else. And to do something else you need to learn by doing.”

And that’s exactly what Nicolai has done over the past five years as he built his company from the ground up, starting with nothing except will, determination and a vision of where he wanted to go. 

To learn more about entrepreneurship see Nicolai Vittrup’s blog here and check out Webamp for tips on using SEO, PPC and everything web related. If you have comments or questions for Nicolai Vittrup, feel free to connect with him on LinkedIn or use the contact form on this site. 

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Your Team: The best resource to help your start-up grow

YOUR TEAM: THE BEST RESOURCE TO HELP YOUR START-UP GROW

Author: Gabriella Anesio


Webamp spoke with Conor Clancy, CEO and co-founder at Skipit. Strong company culture was the focus of the interview, where he told us all about how investing time and resources into your team can be the best money spent. 

Skipit, part of the start-up scene right now, has a core mission to ‘redefine travel’. They are building a platform that connects travellers around the world with public transport, local people, and local businesses – all in furtherance of optimising tourism practices and, in tandem, promoting a sustainable future. Making travellers feel like a local in any given location around the world is the name of the game. 

Integral to the mission in this company, founded in 2019, are two things in particular: innovation and people. Conor is a firm believer in the necessity of investing in the people you will surround yourself with every day, as this is the resource which will help your company excel and innovate the most.

Anyone who’s ever been a part of the start-up scene knows this for sure: the vibrant and exciting energy is the result of so much more than just the ideas bouncing around it’s also about the people behind them. When money, time, and connections are scarce, it becomes more important than ever to invest in people. This is exactly the sentiment preached by entrepreneur Conor Clancy.

“The best resources you can have is your team — having the right people around you that can make things happen and can mean the difference between success and failure.”

Keeping spirits at an all-time high

Once you have a strong team filled with hard-working people, the next step is, naturally, to ensure that the spirit is maintained and the team constantly motivated. This is easier said than done, when you don’t have a hefty budget set aside for entertainment expenses, let alone a hefty pot of money for all your company expenses. But, as Conor said, if you have done a good job at first investing in great people, you don’t need to then spend ludicrous amounts of money for simple, yet effective, gestures that put a smile on employees’ faces. When asked how he tries to keep spirits high in the office, Conor responded: 

“…small office traditions such as “Cher Mondays” (we play Classic Cher every Monday) or buying small snacks for the team. Small acts do not have to cost the world, but can mean a lot to employees.”

Important for Conor is not only the things you actively do to maintain the team spirit, but it is also about the mindset you have

“…I personally like to give room for freedom and flexibility within the workplace. For example with work hours: everyone has their own life and working styles. But of course this is within reason, I expect a certain trade off. By this I mean, if I am to be flexible, I need the staff to also follow this concept, and when we need to put in the extra work and work beyond hours, the flexibility is repaid.”

As a leader, Conor believes that the best way to treat his employees is by giving them enough space to decide when they are most productive – as long as the work gets done, it doesn’t make the world of a difference whether you are a morning person or a “I need half an hour more sleep before I can really begin the day” kind of person. It is this kind of trust in employees that helps maintain positivity and create an exuberant energy in any office. 

Similarly, it is not just about having great relations with employees, but the up-and-coming entrepreneur also believes it is vital for employees to have great relations with each other

“Relations between employees can have a big impact on work in/outputs. Employees must understand each other’s strengths and weaknesses in order to optimize working processes. Furthermore, relations help to spark creativity and innovation, as employees become relaxed with one another and open to sharing ideas and challenges…”

This “creativity and innovation” is something Conor tries to harness in the Skipit offices, with  jottings all over the whiteboard, post-it notes array, and music gently playing in the background. The young entrepreneur hopes and believes that this will help inspire creativity and ensure comfortability in the workplace. 

Naturally, the start-up scene is vastly different from the world of established businesses. Nonetheless, the premise of trust in, and amongst, employees is something that transcends across both worlds: creating an environment where employees feel empowered to make certain decisions without micromanagement is imperative in fostering innovation and a drive to better oneself everyday. 

Of course, with certain decision-making power comes the need to hold oneself accountable, too. Thus, as long as your employees understand that they must be able to admit to their slip-ups or mistakes when/should they occur, there is a strong probability of enhancing work morale in the workplace. 

An international workplace with one Danish rule

With a team of employees and interns from all over the world, there is a strong presence of cultural diversity, something everyone is very proud of at Skipit. 

Despite the eclectic mix of nationalities, there is one strong Danish tradition which Conor stands by: equality between all positions and titles, something which seems to be so characteristic of most workplaces in Denmark. 

“We have a flat hierarchical structure in the office, every person’s opinion and input is welcome, no matter their “title” or “standing” in the company.”

This is something uniquely Danish, and the Skipit team has made sure to adopt this professional approach to the working environment — all in the name of trying to propel innovation. 

To keep up with Skipit’s journey, check them out on LinkedIn, and learn more from the founders themselves: Conor Clancy and Maria Dilling Elken

If you want to learn more on the topic of company culture, have a look at Nicolai Vittrup’s blog. For information on SEO, PPC, and everything web-related, check out Webamp. To reach out to Nicolai Vittrup himself, fill out the contact form on this website or find him on LinkedIn.

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Nicolai Vittrup on leadership: Strong leaders prioritize their teams’ well-being

NICOLAI VITTRUP ON LEADERSHIP: STRONG LEADERS PRIORITIZE THEIR TEAMS’ WELL-BEING

Author: Emily Hunt


Nicolai Vittrup, CEO of Webamp, speaks about the importance of attention to detail and prioritizing the people around him within leadership. Good coach: Vittrup believes drafting a winning team begins with intentionally assessing each member’s strengths and then making them stronger.

As a young boy, Nicolai Vittrup found his start as a leader playing football. He was the captain of his hometown football team. Vittrup recalls always being ambitious from a young age and using that ambition to guide and uplift others. Now, as the CEO of Webamp, he recognizes that being an effective leader begins with paying attention to the details. Vittrup insists, 

“I would not say I started out wanting to be a leader… Think of me as a good coach.”

Coaching Vittrup’s team at Webamp begins with putting the right shoes on his colleagues much like a football sponsor begins by putting the right shoes on their players. At Webamp, this means cultivating an atmosphere where the team is mentally and physically cared for. Vittrup is a leader who cares about the happiness of those around him. He wants his colleagues and clients to be comfortable enough to be their best self. Then, they can begin engaging in meaningful connection with others. According to Vittrup, 

“If people are happy and know how to talk with one another then it is very, very easy to be a leader.”

In regards to keeping his team at Webamp in shape, Vittrup intentionally creates spaces and opportunities for his team to care for each other and themselves. Happiness is an individual and collective pursuit. Webamp is community centered. 

Effective Leadership & Good Business

Nicolai Vittrup does not claim to be the smartest man in the room. In fact, he shares his hopes of never being the smartest man in the room. That is, Vittrup is a humble and empathetic leader. He is passionate about leadership that hinges on collaboration. Vittrup believes that he can learn and find meaningful inspiration from those he works with. He has intentionally built up a team at Webamp that exercises an equality of all voices. Vittrup states,

“When I started my dream was not to be a leader or an entrepreneur. It was just something I had to be if I wanted to do good business.” 

However, Vittrup recognizes better than most that doing good business hinges on intentionally cultivating relationships among Webamp and its clients. In doing so, he has led Webamp to being a place where people want to be, stay, and inspire others.

For more on leadership see Nicolai Vittrup’s blog. Additionally, see Webamp for tips on SEO, PPC and all things web. If you have questions or comments for Nicolai Vittrup, please use the contact form on this website or connect with him on LinkedIn.

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Nicolai Vittrup on company culture: It’s simple; always strive to make it better

NICOLAI VITTRUP ON COMPANY CULTURE: IT’S SIMPLE; ALWAYS STRIVE TO MAKE IT BETTER

Author: Emily Hunt


Nicolai Vittrup, CEO of Webamp, discusses the company’s people-first culture, DNA, and freedom to think. Founder of Webamp, Nicolai Vittrup, believes that positive company culture begins with building better people and cultivating an atmosphere of conversation and collaboration. In this interview, he shares his view on creating a better environment for his coworkers.

Company culture is important to Nicolai Vittrup and in an interview the founder shared his opinion on exactly why he puts so much focus on it. Webamp’s company culture hinges on a people first mindset that begins in the workspace, spreads outward to involve clients, and ultimately gains recognition from the greater community. 

As CEO, Nicolai Vittrup thinks a lot about creating consistency within company culture, but thinks even more about people. After all, putting people first is at the heart of WebAmp’s culture. This starts with building an effective, efficient, and empathetic team. Vittrup states, 

“When it comes to our product and service at Webamp it is our team that is the most important thing. We use a lot of brain power in how we can build better people because that’s really what matters.”

While team building at Webamp, Nicolai Vittrup looks for high performers. These people are self-motivated, empathetic, passionate, and innovative. Within Webamp, everyone’s voice is considered equal. As a result, Vittrup finds it easy to challenge himself and those around him. Everyone works together to better themselves, each other, and Webamp at large from the inside out. This collaboration and understanding throughout the company drives Vittrup to look for inspiration from people within Webamp rather than looking to outside sources. He stays true to the company DNA. When asked about his goals for Webamp going forward Vittrup confidently stated, 

“I care about growing as a leader and as a team. I believe there is more we can do to cultivate company culture within Webamp and the broader community. People see us and take note of what we are doing. Going forward, my goal is simple: to be better, always.” 

According to Vittrup, the key to always becoming better is cultivating a company of passionate, free-thinking, empathetic people. Vittrup is a strong advocate for the ability of his colleagues to think critically and creatively. Fluidity of thought allows for more impactful conversation and collaboration within Webamp. Everyone is considered equal. Everyone has a unique voice and is encouraged to use it. Webamp’s company culture allows for innovation by leaving the discourse open to everyone. 

Looking for more on company culture? Check out Nicolai Vittrup’s blog.  Still eager for more? See Webamp for tips on SEO, PPC and all things web. If you have questions or comments for Nicolai Vittrup, please use the contact form on this website or connect with him on LinkedIn.

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Diversity fighter: Your employees need to connect with your written values

DIVERSITY FIGHTER: YOUR EMPLOYEES NEED TO CONNECT WITH YOUR WRITTEN VALUES

Author: Gabriella Anesio


Webamp spoke with Helene Aagaard, CEO and Partner at Diversity Factor, about the necessity of standing by company values, both inside and outside of the workplace.

Diversity Factor, founded in 2019, is a company dedicated to helping other companies thrive through achieving one key goal: diversity in the workplace. With diversity comes a ripple effect which positively impacts not only the individuals that a company is comprised of, but also the company culture, and, therefore, company performance.

Helene Aagaard and her team at Diversity Factor are on a mission to help companies around the world realise organisational excellence through diversity, and believe in a key ingredient of success: being as authentic as you possibly can. When asking Helene what she thought was absolutely essential for any company trying to convey a message or a product, she responded: 

“You can have the best written values, but if your employees do not connect to these, it will not be reflected in the culture…Your people are your company and your values.”

With regard to values, Diversity Factor has four main pillars to adhere to: equality, transparency, reliability, and excellence. In line with this, then, Helene stands firmly by the principle that you need to “walk the talk” or company values are rendered meaningless and insincere. 

Companies are built by people

By these standards, companies need to strive as much as possible to ensure that personal values match and align to company values. Whether a start-up or established company, big or small, local or international, authenticity stems from a company wherein the employees don’t leave their values at work at the end of the day they also take them home and practice them just as they preach in the office from nine to five. Values aren’t something you can choose to just switch on and off (if they are authentic, that is). 

“Companies – whether start-ups, scale-ups or big corporates – are built by people. They bring in their values, opinions and behaviors, when they go to work. It is not something we as people can leave at home before going to work. So in the end, it is the people who form the culture of a company.”

 

Slow and steady wins the race

Of course, business at Diversity Factor doesn’t just depend on the values and attitudes of employees — clients, also, need to have an openness to the values espoused by Helene and her colleagues (or at least, that’s the goal).

When asking Helene about the difficulties of working with the kind of mission Diversity Factor has, she responded that it isn’t just one-off challenges they must deal with once in a blue moon, but rather:

“We do that [face challenges] every day as an advisor and consultants within this field. Diversity and inclusion is uncomfortable work. We need to look at the culture, structures and the individual behaviour and attitudes. And that can be really hard, which is also why we try to take the diversity and inclusion journey in small steps with our clients, and always start with data and facts.”

Evidently, having a pragmatic and patient approach is necessary when working with such a heavy, yet crucial, message such as diversity in the workplace. It is clear that motivation to learn, progress, and adapt — on both the side of the client as well as the company — are all required to yield any sort of results, regardless of the business or industry one works in. As Helene points out about her experience at Diversity Factor: 

“…we’re not about “hauling businesses”, kicking and screaming into the world of diversity and inclusion. We are there for the ones that have had that penny-dropping moment that diversity and inclusion is not there to scare them and to beat them up. It’s there to liberate their organisation and future-proof it.”

If one takes this sentiment and generalises it to the broader context of the universe of entrepreneurship: you can never enforce your values onto someone, but if you’re authentic and you stand by the values you preach, the least you can hope for and expect is reciprocated sincerity. 

This is an important lesson for any company, whether in the starting stages or five years down the road — not everyone will like what you do or what you stand for, but the best business comes from those that relate to your ethics and your core message(s). 

We’d like to say a special thanks to Helene Aagaard for her insightful comments, and if you want to learn about Diversity Factor, read more on their website and LinkedIn.

For more on company culture see Nicolai Vittrup’s blog and check out Webamp for tips on SEO, PPC and everything web. If you have questions or comments for Nicolai Vittrup you can use the contact form on this website or connect with him on LinkedIn.

 

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Webamp welcomes an international intern to the team

WEBAMP WELCOMES AN INTERNATIONAL TO THE TEAM


The conventional view on internships is that interns get the opportunity to learn certain industry-specific skills, and employees get the chance to make use of the work provided by the interns.

At Webamp, we have a much broader appreciation of what it means to onboard an intern, especially an international one.

Bringing an intern into the team means that both ends of the party introduce each other to new values, and, in the process, challenge certain mindsets and customs otherwise taken for granted — it’s not all about technical skills acquired or work produced.

There is so much that both the intern and the rest of the team can learn from each other.

A new face means renewed dynamic

We’ve had great success at Webamp with Danish interns before, and it has been great to see an array of people with an array of skills thriving in our company. However, international interns are a different ballpark. So, here at Webamp, we decided it was time to bring a new perspective and a renewed energy to the team. We did this through welcoming a half-Brazilian, half-Swedish, UK-raised content writing intern, Gabriella, last Friday.

We wanted to make sure she felt as welcomed and motivated as possible to begin working at our company, so we made sure to decorate her desk accordingly and call a team meeting where everyone got to be introduced.

Already on her first day, there was a visible shift in the way the office operated — a good kind of shift! We were all suddenly practicing our English skills, and this meant we were improving ourselves as a team and avoiding complacency.

We believe that one of the most dangerous things a company can experience is stagnation and too much fondness of staying within the comfort zone. Quite frankly, having an international intern in the team doesn’t allow you to stay in your comfort zone.

Learning on both sides of the table

My mantra is freedom under responsibility, and constantly experimenting with your own boundaries; boundaries are not designed to be set in stone — they are dynamic and supposed to be challenged on a daily basis. This means actively seeking new and exciting challenges, and if this means bringing in a non-Danish speaking intern into an all Danish office, then let’s go for it! And that’s exactly what we did.

Pushing yourself out of your comfort zone doesn’t only apply to the Danish members of the office, but also to Gabriella. She’s learning Danish customs and even picking up on some Danish words here and there.

Imagine how far all of us will have progressed, and how much all of us will have learnt, by the end of the four-month internship!

Towards a more open-minded approach

At the end of the day, it’s about finding the right balance between adjusting your own company culture and teaching the new intern your own values. Bringing a non-Danish person into the team doesn’t just mean using more English. It’s also about being more culturally aware of your own customs — customs that we otherwise take for granted or assume are the norm.

For example, something so small as the habit of when to eat lunch has now been put into perspective with the addition of Gabriella. She pointed out that she’s never been in an environment where people go for lunch before 12, even 1 sometimes (here at Webamp, we must just work so hard we get hungry at the 11 o’clock-mark).

Now, it’s important to note, it’s not about changing our values or habits for someone else, it’s just about becoming more self-aware! Reflecting on yourself and your habits are necessary steps to becoming more open-minded and perceptive — traits which can only make your company stronger and more resilient.

So, welcome to the team, Gabriella!

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<\/p>“,”class”:”light”}},{“type”:”headline”,”props”:{“title_element”:”h2″,”content”:”A new face means renewed dynamic”,”class”:”light”}},{“type”:”text”,”props”:{“margin”:”default”,”column_breakpoint”:”m”,”content”:”

We\u2019ve had great success at Webamp with Danish interns before, and it has been great to see an array of people with an array of skills thriving in our company. However, international interns are a different ballpark. So, here at Webamp, we decided it was time to bring a new perspective and a renewed energy to the team. We did this through welcoming a half-Brazilian, half-Swedish, UK-raised content writing intern, Gabriella, last Friday.<\/p>\n

We wanted to make sure she felt as welcomed and motivated as possible to begin working at our company, so we made sure to decorate her desk accordingly and call a team meeting where everyone got to be introduced. <\/p>“,”class”:”light”}},{“type”:”image”,”props”:{“margin”:”default”,”image_svg_color”:”emphasis”,”image”:”wp-content\/uploads\/flag2.1.jpg”,”image_width”:”600″}},{“type”:”text”,”props”:{“margin”:”default”,”column_breakpoint”:”m”,”content”:”

Already on her first day, there was a visible shift in the way the office operated \u2014 a good kind of shift! We were all suddenly practicing our English skills, and this meant we were improving ourselves as a team and avoiding complacency.<\/p>\n

We believe that one of the most dangerous things a company can experience is stagnation and too much fondness of staying within the comfort zone. Quite frankly, having an international intern in the team doesn\u2019t allow you to stay in your comfort zone.<\/p>“,”class”:”light”}},{“type”:”headline”,”props”:{“title_element”:”h2″,”content”:”Learning on both sides of the table”,”text_align”:”left”,”class”:”light”}},{“type”:”text”,”props”:{“margin”:”default”,”column_breakpoint”:”m”,”content”:”

My mantra is freedom under responsibility, and constantly experimenting with your own boundaries; boundaries are not designed to be set in stone \u2014 they are dynamic and supposed to be challenged on a daily basis. This means actively seeking new and exciting challenges, and if this means bringing in a non-Danish speaking intern into an all Danish office, then let\u2019s go for it! And that\u2019s exactly what we did.<\/p>\n

Pushing yourself out of your comfort zone doesn\u2019t only apply to the Danish members of the office, but also to Gabriella. She\u2019s learning Danish customs and even picking up on some Danish words here and there.<\/p>\n

Imagine how far all of us will have progressed, and how much all of us will have learnt, by the end of the four-month internship!<\/p>“,”class”:”light”}},{“type”:”headline”,”props”:{“title_element”:”h2″,”content”:”Towards a more open-minded approach”,”class”:”light”}},{“type”:”text”,”props”:{“margin”:”default”,”column_breakpoint”:”m”,”content”:”

At the end of the day, it\u2019s about finding the right balance between adjusting your own company culture and teaching the new intern your own values. Bringing a non-Danish person into the team doesn\u2019t just mean using more English. It\u2019s also about being more culturally aware of your own customs \u2014 customs that we otherwise take for granted or assume are the norm.<\/p>\n

For example, something so small as the habit of when to eat lunch has now been put into perspective with the addition of Gabriella. She pointed out that she\u2019s never been in an environment where people go for lunch before 12, even 1 sometimes (here at Webamp, we must just work so hard we get hungry at the 11 o\u2019clock-mark).<\/p>\n

Now, it\u2019s important to note, it\u2019s not about changing our values or habits for someone else, it\u2019s just about becoming more self-aware! Reflecting on yourself and your habits are necessary steps to becoming more open-minded and perceptive \u2014 traits which can only make your company stronger and more resilient.<\/p>\n

So, welcome to the team, Gabriella!<\/strong> <\/p>“,”class”:”light”}},{“type”:”image”,”props”:{“margin”:”default”,”image_svg_color”:”emphasis”,”image”:”wp-content\/uploads\/heleholdet1.jpg”,”image_width”:”600″}},{“type”:”social”,”props”:{“link_style”:”button”,”gap”:”small”,”margin”:”default”,”link_2″:”https:\/\/www.facebook.com\/nicolai.k.vittrup”,”link_3″:”https:\/\/www.instagram.com\/nicvittrup\/”,”link_4″:”https:\/\/twitter.com\/nictrillion”,”link_1″:”https:\/\/www.linkedin.com\/in\/nicolaivittrup\/”,”link_target”:true}}]},{“type”:”column”,”props”:{“image_position”:”center-center”,”media_overlay_gradient”:””,”width_medium”:”1-3″},”children”:[{“type”:”html”,”props”:{“content”:”\n

Let’s talk!<\/h3>\n
“,”attributes”:”uk-sticky=\”offset: 150; top:0; bottom:#sticky-stop\””}}]}],”props”:{“layout”:”2-3,1-3″,”divider”:true}},{“type”:”row”,”props”:{“id”:”sticky-stop”},”children”:[{“type”:”column”,”props”:{“image_position”:”center-center”,”media_overlay_gradient”:””},”children”:[]}]},{“type”:”row”,”children”:[{“type”:”column”,”props”:{“image_position”:”center-center”,”media_overlay_gradient”:””},”children”:[{“type”:”divider”,”props”:{“divider_element”:”hr”}},{“type”:”pagination”,”props”:{“pagination_type”:”numeric”,”text_align”:”center”,”class”:”pagination-blog”}},{“type”:”divider”,”props”:{“divider_element”:”hr”}}]}]}],”name”:”blog-ny”}],”version”:”2.1.2″} –>

Webamp today – a cultural company with space for fun and learning

Webamp today – a cultural company with space for fun and learning


Here at Webamp, we value one thing above all else: the concept of freedom under responsibility. This means learning to push your boundaries every day in order to get more exceptional results than the day before. 

Nicolai is a firm believer in the concept that magic happens when one is allowed to play with boundaries and try new things out. Only then can you become better at something. But part of this is also failing.

“It is crucial to dare to fail – this is because it is only through failing that you allow yourself to seek new opportunities and test your boundaries. The most important thing is to have the courage to admit this to yourself, and especially to admit this to your customers. This is what we call transparency.” 

To be precise, transparency and honesty are the key words to describe Webamp today. For Nicolai, being open about when things aren’t running as smoothly as predicted is equally as important as telling customers when things are going great. 

Even now that Webamp is a well-established company, for Nicoai it is still essential that Webamp remains a fun space open for exploration and playing with boundaries – a space where his employees can try new things, develop new skills, and constantly be learning. As he says:

“We are not always the best, but we always seek to be better than yesterday.”

When asking Nicolai about success, it is clear that entrepreneurship and his journey at Webamp have taught him an important lesson

One quickly works out that success isn’t synonymous with money. Success is all about entrepreneurship. It is a result of all your success. Money is not the most important thing and it never will be.

Even if entrepreneurship can result in some bumps along the way, it is these bumps that give you the experiences that allow you to grow, develop, and eventually make the right decisions. Therefore, Nicolai also has a piece of advice for new companies that immerse themselves in lots of different projects. 

“Learn from the mistakes you are making now. These are the cheapest mistakes you will make, and the most frequent mistakes you make are those that will lead to the most success.”

At the end of the day, as long as you remind yourself that bumps along the way don’t define you or your future, success is really what you make of it yourself – so dream big!

Skal vi tale sammen?



Nicolai Vittrup

Stolen client lists and father’s sofa: Big decisions should not be made under pressure

Stolen client lists and father’s sofa: Big decisions should not be made under pressure


Webamp-director Nicolai Vittrup was interviewed by Iværksætterhistorier (Entrepreneur Stories). He talks about everything from giving up his apartment and moving in with his dad to the importance of not making decisions under pressure.

In a conversation with Esben Brandborg Østerby from Iværksætterhistorier, Webamp-director Nicolai Vittrup shared his experience with his company. Even if there was resistance in the beginning, the 28-year old entrepreneur knew already from the start of Webamp that he was in the right place.

And here he would stay – whatever it took or cost. This also meant certain sacrifices had to be made, to ensure everything would run as smoothly as possible.

First and foremost, it was important to ensure his freelancers earned enough money to live on.

“It was more about how I could finance others, as opposed to myself. So I chose to ring my father and ask if I could move back into the same room I had moved out of six years ago.”

For Nicolai’s father, this idea wasn’t initially one met with open arms. It wasn’t exactly up to the family to be self-sufficient, and entrepreneurship was not something they had dealt with before as a family.

Nicolai’s father asked an obvious question: “Why the hell don’t you just get a job?”, to which Nicolai immediately asserted: “I damn believe in this, father. Let me show you the calculations!”.

And even if the calculations weren’t smack-bang correct, they still worked – despite the bumps along the way.

As it turned out, the two freelancers couldn’t come to terms with not being made partners. Despite Nicolai being under immense financial pressures, he was quickly convinced by his personal mentor/father that it was definitely not partners that he needed.

“I learnt today that you should not make big decisions when you feel pressured. The best time to make a decision, that is so big, is a time when there is synergy and a sense of calm in the company – this way the decision doesn’t become a ‘way out’, but is a thought-through commitment.”

This resulted in the two freelancers, without Nicolai’s knowledge, opening their own firm by stealing the client list Nicolai had worked so hard to create himself. This was a turning point for him, where he appreciated more than ever the personal relations you create with your customers.

“This was the first time in my life that I discovered that personal relations come before anything else. If you are close enough with your customers, then they do not just switch companies, but call and give you an honest explanation about receiving another offer.”

On top of that, it was the first time he could notice the entrepreneurial feeling of truly having created something – something that someone wanted to steal from him.

“I remember that this was the first time in my life I had a war-like mentality which really influenced me, and I feel like I had truly created something. And they could see it too – why the hell else would they steal from me?”

Luckily, Nicolai had great client relations already, and, therefore, practically didn’t lose any clients to the freelancers. Whilst he didn’t lose all his customers, he did learn a valuable life lesson about people: you should always tread carefully and try your hardest to work out who you can and cannot trust.

After all this, business began to pick up quickly – the focus was on not spending more money than was available, in addition to building a team at Webamp by hiring more people. Today, the result of all this hard work is a team of skilled web developers and specialists in both Google Ads and SEO.

Most important of all for Nicolai is that his employees are passionate, motivated, and adopt the mentality he values so much himself: freedom under responsibility.

“If you don’t appreciate the concept of freedom under responsibility, then Webamp isn’t the right place for you.”

You can hear the whole story about Webamp and Nicolai here.

Skal vi tale sammen?



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